We can characterize market structures based on the competition levels and the nature of these markets.

There are two general categories of duopoly: Cournot and Bertrand.
The dictionary definition of a duopoly is a market where there are exactly two sellers. Edgeworth duopoly Duopoly (from the Greek «duo», two, and «polein», to sell) is a type of oligopoly . So understandably not all markets are same or similar. Duopoly (from the Greek «duo», two, and «polein», to sell) is a type of oligopoly. Duopoly.

Both the firms are interdependent and they try to keep the same price. Cournot competition is an economic model used to describe an industry structure in which companies compete on the amount of output they will produce, which they decide on independently of each other and at the same time.

This kind of imperfect competition is characterized by having only two firms in the market producing a homogeneous good .

A product of both the sellers is Homogeneous and the prices are also the same. DUOPOLY is a special case of oligopoly, in which there are exactly two sellers. A duopoly is a special type of oligopoly in which the market has only two firms.

Let us study the four basic types of market structures.

This kind of imperfect competition is characterized by having only two firms in the market producing a homogeneous good . As we have seen, in economics the definition of a market has a very wide scope. This is because having a perfect duopoly (just like having a perfectly competitive market) is virtually impossible. Duopoly is a type of oligopoly market structure that consists of only two large firms dominating the market, having the power over price.
They have a complete hold over the supply of that product. 4. Firstly, Cournot competition is a model that relies in the assumption that there are two firms in the market which simultaneously choose quantity while producing homogeneous goods. In practice, you will see markets with two big sellers and a bunch of little sellers. There are several types of oligopolies. A market wherein there are two sellers or producers of a product is called do a Duopoly. We analyze two types of duopoly information equilibrium, Cournot and Bertrand, which emerge, respectively, from quantity and price competition, and show that the incentives for information sharing and its welfare consequences depend crucially on the type of competition, the nature of the goods (substitutes or complements), and the degree of product differentation. Under duopoly, it is assumed that the product sold by the two firms is homogeneous and there is no substitute for it.